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Husbandry Documents

Manchester MuseumThis page includes a wide range of articles related to various aspects of amphibian husbandry. You can search for specific words within the title, author and description fields by using the Search field in the menu bar at the top of this page.

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  • Icon of Amphibians in the Classroom or at Home Amphibians in the Classroom or at Home (4 files)
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  • Icon of Document Templates Document Templates (11 files)
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  • Icon of Enclosures Enclosures (6 files)
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  • Icon of Feeding and Nutrition Feeding and Nutrition (22 files)
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  • Icon of General Husbandry Documents General Husbandry Documents (9 files)
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  • Icon of Health Health (51 files)
    • Icon of Biosecurity and Quarantine Biosecurity and Quarantine (15 files)
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    • Icon of Diseases Diseases (11 files)
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    • Icon of Drugs and Treatment Drugs and Treatment (6 files)
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    • Icon of Frog Anatomy Charts Frog Anatomy Charts (3 files)
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    • Icon of Haematology Haematology (3 files)
      • Icon of A field method for sampling blood of male anurans with hypertrophied limbs A field method for sampling blood of male anurans with hypertrophied limbs (525.2 KB)
        Blood analysis is an essential tool in evaluating the health of amphibians; examination and analysis of blood cells provide important information on blood-parasite levels (Desser 2001), the status of different organ systems, and insights on the status of the immune system (Marnila et al. 1995). Blood samples can also be analyzed for genetic, toxicological, and stable isotopes and for disease in general or for the presence of specific infectious diseases (Bulté et al. 2006). Challenges of amphibian venipuncture include the small sizes of specimens with few available venipuncture sites (Heatley and Johnson 2009). Non-invasive or minimally invasive sampling methods are preferable when working with endangered or declining amphibian species (Pidancier et al. 2003).
        Author:Tapley, B., Acosta-Galvis, A.R., and Lopez, J
        Version:Phyllomedusa 10(1):75–77, 2011
        Language:English

      • Icon of Clinical Technique: Amphibian Hematology: A Practitioner’s Guide Clinical Technique: Amphibian Hematology: A Practitioner’s Guide (1.8 MB)
        Amphibian hematology is challenging because of a combination of several factors including small patient size, few venipuncture sites, lack of normative data, and basic variability of the amphibian leukocyte and erythrocyte counts. The following brief guidelines are presented in an attempt to guide the clinical practitioner as to collection and interpretive techniques, which can easily be adapted to clinical practice for these fragile jewels of nature.
        Author:J. Jill Heatley and Mark Johnson, Texas A&M University
        Version:Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine, Vol 18, No 1 ( January), 2009: p
        Language:English

      • Icon of Hematology of Lower Vertebrates Hematology of Lower Vertebrates (30.1 KB)
        The proper evaluation of the hemogram of any animal patient involves the determination of a total erythrocyte count [TRBC], packed cell volume [PCV], hemoglobin concentration [Hb], total white blood cell count [TWBC], white blood cell differential, and the evaluation of a stained peripheral blood film. The basic techniques used in mammalian hematology also apply to that of lower vertebrates, such as birds and reptiles. However, because lower vertebrates have nucleated erythrocytes and thrombocytes, there are a few modifications to the techniques.

        In: 55th Annual Meeting of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists (ACVP) and 39th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Pathology (ASVCP), 2004 - Orlando, FL, USA.
        Author:T. W. Campbell
        Version:American College of Veterinary Pathologists & American Society f
        Language:English

    • Icon of Medicine Medicine (4 files)
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    • Icon of Protocols Protocols (9 files)
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  • Icon of Light and UV Light and UV (10 files)
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  • Icon of National Amphibian Action Plans National Amphibian Action Plans (11 files)
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  • Icon of Population Management Population Management (7 files)
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  • Icon of Program development Program development (9 files)
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  • Icon of Rearing Rearing (3 files)
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  • Icon of Reintroduction Reintroduction (3 files)
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  • Icon of Reproduction Reproduction (4 files)
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  • Icon of Species-specific Husbandry Species-specific Husbandry (33 files)
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  • Icon of Species-specific Management Plans Species-specific Management Plans (17 files)
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  • Icon of Water and Water Quality Water and Water Quality (6 files)
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  • Icon of Workshop presentations Workshop presentations (18 files)
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