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Husbandry Documents

Manchester MuseumThis page includes a wide range of articles related to various aspects of amphibian husbandry. You can search for specific words within the title, author and description fields by using the Search field in the menu bar at the top of this page.

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We are currently expanding this page to include a wide range of amphibian husbandry reference documents. If you would like to submit additional documents for this page, you can submit them using this form.

  • Icon of Amphibian Action Plans Amphibian Action Plans (15 files)
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  • Icon of Amphibians in the Classroom or at Home Amphibians in the Classroom or at Home (4 files)
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  • Icon of Document Templates Document Templates (5 files)
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  • Icon of Enclosures Enclosures (6 files)
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  • Icon of Feeding and Nutrition Feeding and Nutrition (22 files)
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  • Icon of General Husbandry Documents General Husbandry Documents (14 files)
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  • Icon of Health Health (50 files)
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  • Icon of Light and UV Light and UV (10 files)
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  • Icon of Population Management Population Management (7 files)
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  • Icon of Program development Program development (2 files)
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  • Icon of Rearing Rearing (3 files)
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  • Icon of Reintroduction Reintroduction (3 files)
    • Icon of Global Re-introduction Perspectives: 2016 (Amphibian case studies) Global Re-introduction Perspectives: 2016 (Amphibian case studies) (1.4 MB)
      Re‐introductions are powerful and important. They are powerful in terms of averting extinction, restoring ecological functions to ecosystems, and returning profound commercial, aesthetic, or cultural value. Re-introductions are important, because they can engage generations across the globe in immediate conservation action that has the potential to make a tangible and pervasive difference.

      The fifth edition of the Global Re‐introduction Perspectives, published by the IUCN/SSC Re-introduction Specialist Group, contains a wide array of projects ranging from corals to amphibians, crocodiles to condors and African lions to many plant species. All these come with different levels of success and some failures. This shows that reintroduction projects are never easy and require careful planning and implementation to succeed. However, projects, which have not been successful for one reason or another, provide valuable learning experience, so that those shortcomings could be avoided.

      This chapter on Amphibians includes three re-introduction case studies:  the Northern Corroboree Frog in Australia, the Agile Frog on Jersey, Channel Islands, and the Northern Leopard Frog in Canada.
      Author:Soorae, P. S. (ed.)
      Version:2016
      Language:English

    • Icon of Guidelines for Reintroductions and Other Conservation Translocations Guidelines for Reintroductions and Other Conservation Translocations (512.8 KB)
      The Reintroduction and Invasive Species Specialist Groups’ Task Force on Moving Plants and Animals for Conservation Purposes.

      Conservation translocation is the deliberate movement of organisms from one site for release in another. It must be intended to yield a measurable conservation benefit at the levels of a population, species or ecosystem, and not only provide benefit to translocated individuals. These Guidelines are designed to be applicable to the full spectrum of conservation translocations. They are based on principle rather than example. Throughout the Guidelines there are references to accompanying Annexes that give further detail.
      Author:IUCN/SSC
      Version:Version 1, 2013
      Language:English

    • Icon of Translocation Proposal - Securing the Future of Kosciuszko National Park’s Unique Frog Fauna Translocation Proposal - Securing the Future of Kosciuszko National Park’s Unique Frog Fauna (1.8 MB)
      Extinctions and declines of amphibians worldwide have been occurring at an alarming rate over the past fifty years (Stuart et al. 2004). Australia has not been spared from this biodiversity crisis (Hero & Morrison 2004), and within Kosciuszko National Park (hereafter KNP), five frog species have suffered significant declines since the early 1980’s. These species are now listed as threatened under the NSW Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995, the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, and by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). This includes the iconic Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree), which is one of Australia’s best known frog species, and is KNP’s only endemic vertebrate. The primary cause of many recent frog declines around the world, including those in KNP, is a disease known as chytridiomycosis, which is caused by infection with the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd). Genetic studies have shown that Bd has only recently spread throughout the world (Morgan et al. 2007, Farrer et al. 2011), explaining why many frog species have limited resistance to this pathogen.

      This document outlines the background information, rationale, and methods for developing new management techniques for the conservation of Kosciuszko National Park’s unique frog fauna. These techniques will aim to bolster the security and capacity of captive breeding programs for threatened frogs through the creation of pathogen/disease free populations in the wild.
      Author:David Hunter, Michael McFadden, Gerry Marantelli, Ben Scheele, Raelene Hobbs, Peter Harlow, Chris Banks, Laura Brannelly, Lee Skerratt and Lee Berger
      Version:January 2013
      Language:English

  • Icon of Reproduction Reproduction (4 files)
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  • Icon of Taxon-specific Husbandry Taxon-specific Husbandry (30 files)
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  • Icon of Taxon-specific Management Plans Taxon-specific Management Plans (16 files)
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  • Icon of Water and Water Quality Water and Water Quality (6 files)
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  • Icon of Workshop presentations Workshop presentations (18 files)
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