AArk logo

Ecnomiohyla rabborum

Amazing AmphibiansThe Rabbs’ Fringe-limbed Treefrog, Ecnomiohyla rabborum, is listed as ‘Critically Endangered’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM. Its small range is in the mountains around El Valle de Anton in Central Panama. It is possibly endemic to this area. This treefrog lives in the forest canopy, and is known for using its extensive toe webbing to glide from tree to tree.

Ecnomiohyla rabborum

The Rabbs’ Fringe-limbed Treefrog is named after TWO people, Dr. George Rabb, a previous chairman of the IUCN Species Survival Commission and the former director of the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago, Illinois, and Mary Rabb, who was a biology teacher and past librarian at Brookfield Zoo. The naming of this frog is in recognition of George and Mary Rabb for their contributions to conservation, and for their major support of amphibian conservation programs around the world.

The main threat to Rabbs’ Fringe-limbed Treefrog is thought to be the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Since this fungus was found in the area in 2006, the population has declined and only one individual has been heard in the wild since. Another threat is sprawling development of El Valle.

Individuals were taken for captive breeding at the El Valle Amphibian Conservation Center, in El Valle de Anton, Panama, but reproduction has not yet been successful. There are continuous field surveys in the area, but the last observation of Rabbs’ Fringe-limbed Treefrog in the wild was a call heard in 2007.

Submit your observations of this species to iNaturalist and they will appear on this map. Learn more about this species on Amphibiaweb.

More Amazing Amphibians here.

Produced in partnership with:

Senior Partners

Amphibian Specialist Group Amphibia Web Amphibian Ark iNaturalist.orgGlobal Amphibian BioBlitz

Focal Partners

IUCN SSC

Affiliates

ARKive Synchronicity Earth Amphibian Survival Alliance The Sticky Tongue Project

 

How to become an Amazing Amphibians partner:

Outlined below are the roles and responsibilities for the 4 different levels of involvement for potential partners. If your organization would like to be a part of the Amazing Amphibians program in either of these capacities please email amazing@amphibians.org.

Senior Partner – These partners will help with multiple aspects of the program, help facilitate the completion of several species profiles, publicize each Amazing Amphibian and will likely have a landing page for the program on their website. This level of partner will be leading in using their communication channels to gather additional information for the program such as images and data points for iNaturalist.

Strategic Partner – These partners will play an active role in creating species profiles, submitting at least three species profiles per year and actively use their social network to publicize each Amazing Amphibian. This level of partner will be active in using their communication channels to gather additional information for the program such as images and data points for iNaturalist.

Focal Partner – Partners tend to be active in a limited geographic area. This partner will submit at least one regional species profile per year and use their social network to publicize each Amazing Amphibian. This level of partner will be involved in using their communication channels to gather additional information at a regional level for the program such as images and data points for iNaturalist.

Affiliate – These partners are interested in promoting the program but might not be in a position to provide profiles. These partners will publicize each Amazing Amphibian through the social media outlets.

Print Friendly