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Husbandry Documents

Manchester MuseumThis page includes a wide range of articles related to various aspects of amphibian husbandry. You can search for specific words within the title, author and description fields by using the Search field in the menu bar at the top of this page.

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  • Icon of Amphibian Action Plans Amphibian Action Plans (15 files)
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  • Icon of Amphibians in the Classroom or at Home Amphibians in the Classroom or at Home (4 files)
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  • Icon of Document Templates Document Templates (5 files)
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  • Icon of Enclosures Enclosures (6 files)
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  • Icon of Feeding and Nutrition Feeding and Nutrition (22 files)
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  • Icon of General Husbandry Documents General Husbandry Documents (14 files)
    • Icon of Amphibian Biology And Husbandry Amphibian Biology And Husbandry (0.0 B)
      ILAR Journal, Volume 48, Number 3 2007
      Author:F. Harvey Pough
      Language:English

    • Icon of Amphibian Data Entry Guidelines Amphibian Data Entry Guidelines (51.8 KB)
      Amphibian life history characteristics can make data entry challenging. Large clutch sizes and an assortment of life stages can generate data entry inconsistencies within and among institutions and studbooks. As many institutions currently hold amphibians, it is becoming clearer that these data can be recorded in a multitude of ways. The following guidelines will clarify amphibian data entry for both institutional registrars and studbook keepers.

      Issued by: Amphibian Ark, AZA Amphibian Taxon Advisory Group, AZA Institutional Data Management Advisory Group, AZA Population Management Center.
      Language:English

    • Icon of Amphibian Husbandry Resource Guide Amphibian Husbandry Resource Guide (5.1 MB)
      The Association of Zoos and Aquarium (AZA) Amphibian Taxon Advisory Group (ATAG) created the first version of the Amphibian Husbandry Resource Guide in response to the global amphibian crisis as a user-friendly source to aid in the development of successful amphibian conservation programs. Hopefully this second edition of the guide will not only serve as a resource for amphibian husbandry and management, but will help others solve challenges and create additional space for species in need of immediate conservation.
      Author:(Eds) Vicky A. Poole, National Aquarium – Baltimore and Shelly Grow, Association of Zoos & Aquariums
      Version:Edition 2.0, 4 April 2012
      Language:English

    • Icon of Amphibian Resources on the Internet Amphibian Resources on the Internet (96.8 KB)
      The use of amphibians in classrooms and research laboratories has increased, along with a corresponding increase in the amount of information about these animals on the Internet. This review is intended to aid both novices and experts in the search of such information. The bibliography of Internet resources is organized by discipline and includes general and selected species information, taxonomy, natural history, anatomy and histology, physiology, ontogeny, genetics, conservation, toxicology, medicine and surgery, sources (for animals, housing, and research tools), listservs, databases, associations, educational sources, and husbandry.
      Author:Michael W. Nolan and Stephen A. Smith
      Version:ILAR Journal, Volume 48, Number 3 2007
      Language:English

    • Icon of Amphibians and conservation breeding programmes: do all threatened amphibians belong on the ark? Amphibians and conservation breeding programmes: do all threatened amphibians belong on the ark? (522.6 KB)

      Amphibians are facing an extinction crisis, and conservation breeding programmes are a tool used to prevent imminent species extinctions. Compared to mammals and birds, amphibians are considered ideal candidates for these programmes due to their small body size and low space requirements, high fecundity, applicability of reproductive technologies, short generation time, lack of parental care, hard wired behaviour, low maintenance requirements, relative cost effectiveness of such programmes, the success of several amphibian conservation breeding programmes and because captive husbandry capacity exists. Superficially, these reasons appear sound and conservation breeding has improved the conservation status of several amphibian species, however it is impossible to make generalisations about the biology or geo-political context of an entire class. Many threatened amphibian species fail to meet criteria that are commonly cited as reasons why amphibians are suitable for conservation breeding programmes. There are also limitations associated with maintaining populations of amphibians in the zoo and private sectors, and these could potentially undermine the success of conservation breeding programmes and reintroductions. We recommend that species that have been assessed as high priorities for ex situ conservation action are subsequently individually reassessed to determine their suitability for inclusion in conservation breeding programmes. The limitations and risks of maintaining ex situ populations of amphibians need to be considered from the outset and, where possible, mitigated. This should improve programme success rates and ensure that the limited funds dedicated to ex situ amphibian conservation are allocated to projects which have the greatest chance of success.

      Author:Benjamin Tapley, Kay S. Bradfield, Christopher Michaels and Mike Bungard
      Version:Biodivers Conserv DOI 10.1007/s10531-015-0966-9
      Language:English

    • Icon of Amphibians Used in Research and Teaching Amphibians Used in Research and Teaching (86.9 KB)
      Amphibians have long been utilized in scientific research and in education. Historically, investigators have accumulated a wealth of information on the natural history and biology of amphibians, and this body of information is continually expanding as researchers describe new species and study the behaviors of these animals. Amphibians evolved as models for a variety of developmental and physiological processes, largely due to their unique ability to undergo metamorphosis.
      Author:Dorcas P. O’Rourke
      Version:ILAR Journal, Volume 48, Number 3 2007
      Language:English

    • Icon of CBSG/WAZA Amphibian Ex Situ Conservation Planning Workshop Final Report CBSG/WAZA Amphibian Ex Situ Conservation Planning Workshop Final Report (450.1 KB)
      From 12-15 February 2006, CBSG and WAZA hosted an Amphibian Ex Situ Conservation Planning Workshop in El Valle, Panama. Unlike the prior meeting in DC, this group called upon only those amphibian biologists with expertise in the issues surrounding captive maintenance of amphibians. Fifty such people from 14 countries representing every amphibian-inhabited continent divided into four working groups to develop strategies for Organization of the ex situ community, Best Practices for husbandry and quarantine, developing objective criteria for Species Selection, and conceptually organizing Rapid Response Programs. The Working Group Reports compiled into this single document represent the ex situ community’s plan to address the ex situ conservation components of the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan.
      Author:Zippel, K., R. Lacy, and O. Byers (eds.)
      Version:2006
      Language:English

    • Icon of Directrices de Uso de la Gestión Ex situ para la Conservación de Especies de la Comisión de Supervivencia de Especies de la UICN Directrices de Uso de la Gestión Ex situ para la Conservación de Especies de la Comisión de Supervivencia de Especies de la UICN (3.0 MB)

      Se creó un grupo de trabajo para revisar las Directrices Técnicas sobre Gestión de Poblaciones Ex Situ para Conservación de UICN para esclarecer el proceso y armonizar las directrices con los avances que habían tenido lugar desde su publicación en 2002. Este proceso comenzó con un análisis de los pasos de toma de decisiones para evaluar las actividades ex situ para beneficio de la conservación durante la Reunión Anual de la Comisión de Supervivencia de Especies de la UICN (CSE) y del Grupo de Especialistas en Cría para la Conservación (CBSG) en Colonia, Alemania, en octubre de 2010. Este análisis se llevó a cabo por personas involucradas en diferentes Grupos de Especialistas taxonómicos y disciplinares de la CSE, organizaciones de conservación in situ, y la comunidad de zoos y acuarios.

      Author:IUCN/SSC
      Version:Versión 2.0 agosto 2014
      Language:Spanish

    • Icon of Ex situ Management of Amphibians Ex situ Management of Amphibians (1.9 MB)

      In December 2013 , the Central Zoo Authority (CZA) organised a workshop “Building National Capacity for ex-situ Amphibians Management and Conservation” in Guwahati, where a list target and practice species of amphibians were identified. During this workshop the Central Zoo Authority with the assistance of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and the Zoological Society of London has strengthened national capacity in amphibian management. More than 80 delegates from all over India representing nearly 40 institutions participated in these workshops. The participants were exposed to the specific requirements of amphibians in the design and management of ex-situ facilities. The present guidelines on the ex situ management of amphibians are part of output of Ex situ Management of Amphibians the workshop on “Building National Capacity for ex-situ Amphibians Management and Conservation” held at the Assam State Zoo, Guwhati, Assam, India during December, 2013.

      Author:Gupta, B.K., Tapley, B., Vasudevan, K., and Goetz, M.
      Version:2015
      Language:English

    • Icon of Guía para el Manejo de Anfibios en Cautiverio Guía para el Manejo de Anfibios en Cautiverio (2.1 MB)
      Esta Guía para el Manejo de Anfibios en Cautiverio le ayudará a proporcionar el mejor cuidado posible para los anfibios a su cargo. Los protocolos exactos para mantener poblaciones de muchas de las especies que requieren de conservación ex situ son desconocidos, pero esta guía ayudará a asegurar que esté utilizando algunas de las mejores técnicas de mantenimiento conocidas, particularmente con el riesgo actual de enfermedades emergentes cuyo arribo en las colecciones debe ser minimizado y cuya emergencia y transporte debe ser manejado.
      Author:(Eds) Vicky A. Poole, National Aquarium – Baltimore and Shelly Grow, Association of Zoos & Aquariums
      Version:Edición 1.1, 27 Junio 2008
      Language:Spanish

    • Icon of Guidelines on the Use of Ex Situ Management for Species Conservation Guidelines on the Use of Ex Situ Management for Species Conservation (3.1 MB)
      The aim of these guidelines is to provide practical guidance on evaluating the suitability and requirements of an ex situ component for achieving species conservation objectives. They should not be misconstrued as promoting ex situ management over any other form of conservation action, and specific elements should not be selected in isolation to justify ex situ management for conservation. These guidelines replace the 2002 IUCN Technical Guidelines on the Management of Ex Situ Populations for Conservation.
      Author:IUCN/SSC
      Version:Version 2, 2014
      Language:English

    • Icon of Marking techniques - What options are there? Marking techniques - What options are there? (3.9 MB)
      Identification techniques for individual amphibians. (PowerPoint presentation hand outs)
      Author:Gerardo Garcia, Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust
      Version:2009
      Language:English

    • Icon of The Art of Amphibian Science The Art of Amphibian Science (69.0 KB)
      The contributions of amphibians to our understanding of ourselves and our world dates back to the very beginning of science. From the resurgence of science in the Renaissance to the modern science of today, the ability to study amphibians has greatly facilitated our understanding of physiology and basic cellular processes.
      Author:Stephen A. Smith and Michael K. Stoskopf
      Version:ILAR Journal, Volume 48, Number 3 2007
      Language:English

    • Icon of The principles of rapid response for amphibian conservation, using the programmes in Panama as an example The principles of rapid response for amphibian conservation, using the programmes in Panama as an example (1.0 MB)
      As a direct response to many threats facing seriously threatened amphibian species, including habitat loss, pollution and, more recently, emerging infectious disease, ex situ captive-breeding programmes have proven valuable tools in species preservation. Looking at three specific projects, it can be demonstrated that collaborative efforts and multiple-response methods yield positive results in amphibian conservation and species preservation. At the same time, the lessons learned will be examined in each of these projects to allow for future amphibian conservation programmes to consider.
      Author:R. Gagliardo, P. Crump, E. Griffith, J. Mendelson, H. Ross & K. Zippel
      Version:Int. Zoo Yb. (2008) 42: 125–135
      Language:English

  • Icon of Health Health (50 files)
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  • Icon of Light and UV Light and UV (10 files)
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  • Icon of Population Management Population Management (7 files)
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  • Icon of Program development Program development (2 files)
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  • Icon of Rearing Rearing (3 files)
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  • Icon of Reintroduction Reintroduction (3 files)
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  • Icon of Reproduction Reproduction (4 files)
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  • Icon of Taxon-specific Husbandry Taxon-specific Husbandry (30 files)
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  • Icon of Taxon-specific Management Plans Taxon-specific Management Plans (16 files)
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  • Icon of Water and Water Quality Water and Water Quality (6 files)
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  • Icon of Workshop presentations Workshop presentations (18 files)
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